Nevada School Performance Framework

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Late Start

December 13th is the next late start. School starts at 9:15. Busses will pick students up 90 minutes later than scheduled time.

PRIDE Event

Present your Panther/Cub sticker on Friday, December 15th before school in front of the office and get a cup of hot chocolate!

Yummy!

Winter Music Concert

Band and Choir will perform on Thursday, December 20th. Concert begins at 6PM and doors open at 5:30PM.

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Winter Break

Winter break will be December 23 through January 8th. 1st Semester completed. Report cards will be mailed after break.

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Nevada School Performance Framework

 

Click Here for Pau-Wa-Lu Middle School NSPF Report

 

What is the Nevada School Performance Framework (NSPF)?
In July 2012, Nevada's ESEA Flexibility request was approved officially marking an end to the school accountability system known as Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). AYP has now been replaced by the Nevada School Performance Framework (NSPF). The NSPF is an integral component of the Educator Performance System that defines the State's shift away from AYP to a five-star classification approach, with schools earning a rating of 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 stars.

The Nevada School Performance Framework (NSPF) is Nevada’s new school accountability system. It moves away from labeling schools as failing when they aren't reaching the proficiency targets. The NSPF recognizes that nuances exist in school performance and that rating every school as passing or failing is not singularly helpful. The NSPF classifies schools within a five-star performance rating system. The system does not give schools a "pass" and it doesn't re-set the clock. The NSPF includes multiple measures of student achievement and growth and aligns the designations for schools to the delivery of appropriate supports and rewards.

Is the Nevada School Performance Framework less rigorous than the previous system?
Nevada’s system actually holds more schools and students accountable than the AYP system did. For example, by calculating a minority disaggregated group in the Nevada School Performance Framework reports, as opposed to the calculations required for AYP, nearly all minority students in the state are included in accountability determinations. The State's NSPF system accounts for a larger percentage of students in subgroups than AYP.


How is the Nevada School Performance Framework different from AYP?

Nevada’s next generation accountability system is more comprehensive than AYP, moving beyond a focus on proficiency on State assessments and graduation rates. The NSPF incorporates performance on multiple measures of achievement including proficiency, student growth, growth to target, reductions in achievement gaps, and college- and career-readiness indicators, including graduation rate and scores on national college-readiness assessments. This system provides a more complete look at schools’ and districts' success in moving students to college and career readiness.


How is the Nevada School Performance Framework Reported?
Nevada's public schools will receive an index score and a star rating under the NSPF. Use the search feature and pull-down menus above to find your school and view your school's NSPF report.

For elementary and middle schools, star ratings in the NSPF are based on student growth, proficiency, subgroup performance gaps, and average daily attendance. High school ratings are based on student proficiency, subgroup performance gaps, growth, graduation rates, college and career readiness, and other indicators. For all schools, the NSPF will provide actionable feedback to schools and districts to help determine if current practices are aligned to improve educational outcomes for all students.

How is the Nevada School Performance Framework (NSPF) index score computed?
The NSPF index score is a score out of one hundred for a school. Index scores are comprised of the total points earned across several indices. Elementary and middle school indices consist of student growth, proficiency, subgroup performance gaps and other indicators while high school indices consist of student proficiency, subpopulation performance gaps, growth, graduation, career and college readiness and other indicators.


How are star ratings determined?
Star ratings are generally referred to as school “classifications”. The NSPF index score is divided into five score ranges that correspond to star ratings, where five stars is the highest rating. The basis for the five score ranges is the index scores determined using information from the 2010-2011 school year. The overall index values for the schools at the 90th percentile then formed the basis for the point range for 5-Star schools. Conversely, the schools among the lowest 5% of schools within the NSPF formed the basis for a 1-Star rating. Continuing in this manner, a 4-Star rating represents schools in the 75th to 89th percentile range, a 3-Star rating represents schools within the 25th to 74th percentiles and 2-Star schools fall between the 5th and 24th percentiles.


What is a Focus School?
Focus is one of three possible school “designations”. To be identified as a Focus elementary or middle school, a school must be among the lowest performing schools based on the NSPF index points for the subgroup calculations for Adequate Growth Percentiles (AGP) in reading/ELA and mathematics in the current year. To be identified as a Focus high school, a school must be among the lowest performing high schools based on the NSPF index points for the subgroup calculations for graduation and proficiency in reading/ELA and mathematics. Only schools meeting the qualifying criteria for a school designation will receive one, therefore, not all Nevada schools have a designation.


What is a Priority School?
Priority is one of three possible school “designations”. To be identified as a Priority elementary, middle, or high school, a school must be among the lowest performing schools based on the NSPF index points in reading/ELA and mathematics earned in the areas of Performance (Status) and Progress (Growth) during the current year. Only schools meeting the qualifying criteria for a school designation will receive one, therefore, not all Nevada schools have a designation.


What is a Reward School?
Reward is one of three possible school “designations”. Reward schools are identified as being among the highest performing schools for achievement on the State assessments (High Performance), growth over time on the State assessments (High Progress) and, for high schools, excellent graduation rates (High Performance – Graduation). Elementary and middle schools who are both High Performance and High Progress schools will be designated as Exemplary. High schools who are High Performance, High Progress and High Performance – Graduation will be designated as Exemplary. Only schools meeting the qualifying criteria for a school designation will receive one, therefore, not all Nevada schools have a designation.


What is an index score?
In the NSPF, the index score is a score on a scale from 1 to 100 for a school. Index scores are comprised of the total points earned across several indicators. Elementary and middle school indicators are based on student growth, subgroup performance gaps and other indicators while high school indicators are based on student proficiency, subgroup performance gaps, growth, graduation, college and career readiness and other indicators. Due to school size limitations, some schools earn an adjusted index score. Index scores are associated with star ratings, or classifications. For example, a school that earns 81 index points is classified as a five star school.

 

 

 

 


 

 

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